Thomas Plummer: Fitness Professionals Only Have Two Speeds Gray Cook: Chop and Lift Basics Stuart McGill: Scientific Odds Ratios and Injury Gray Cook: Rolling Isn’t Magic Sue Falsone: Cervical Thoracic Junction Yoga Mobility Drill Chuck Wolf: The Big Movement Rocks Upper and Lower-Crossed Syndrome in Athletes Stuart McGill: Testing Athletes with Jumps T-Spine Mobility: Why It’s Important Mark Reifkind: Body Maintenance — The Power of Routine
Unilateral exercises like step-ups and single-leg toe touches are particularly effective at strengthening the glutes, while walking lunges, lateral lunges, air squats, and jump squats will zero in on all the muscles surrounding the hips. Whether you’re at the gym or heading out for (or back from!) a run, these five moves will strengthen and open your hips, keep them loose long-term, and not only make you a better runner, but make running feel better to you.
If most inner-thigh openers feel too easy (and your ankles and knees are injury-free), try Frog Pose. Get down on all fours, with palms on the floor and your knees on blankets or a mat (roll your mat lengthwise, like a tortilla, and place it under your knees for more comfort). Slowly widen your knees until you feel a comfortable stretch in your inner thighs, keeping the inside of each calf and foot in contact with the floor. Make sure to keep your ankles in line with your knees. Lower down to your forearms. Stay here for at least 30 seconds.
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